Can you be an Introvert and a CEO who drives growth?

Well, yes, actually you can. In my research for my upcoming book, The Introvert CEO, I found just that.

For example, one quietly brilliant CEO, instead of picturing himself as a knight on a charger riding to the rescue of an ailing company, described himself as a good follower: following the needs of the clients, employees and Board.  Within two years of his arrival, his failing organization was a Fortune 500 company.

Another expressed gratitude for all the opportunities that he had encountered in his life, opportunities that he now tries to offer to his own employees. Under his leadership, his company is thriving.

When asked to describe how he got to his leadership role, another CEO of a successful company said simply, “I was invited.” At every step of the way, he received an invitation to move ahead. It apparently never occurred to him to fight his way to leadership. He didn’t think of it as a competition. He saw his task as that of an intense problem-solver.

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Simple Gifts

Personal note

Last night I traveled through the first snowstorm of the season to give my new talk, “The Roadmap to Cherish,” to a group of divorcing women. Apprehensive and fearful about the process through which they are going, they nevertheless were thoughtful and even humorous about the plight of the person who has experienced what was perceived as the safety of a relationship, only to find that the floor has been pulled out from underneath.

Their comments made me think more fully about how important it is to nurture and learn to cherish ourselves. If Christmas emphasizes the spirit of giving, the concept doesn’t rule out giving to oneself. Or as one person put it, “Self-care” is not the same as “Selfish.”

Think about it as you acquire gifts for everyone this holiday season.
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Handling the stress of rejection

Personal note

It’s still the beginning of the year, and all around me friends and associates are reaching out to find new ways to make their lives go forward.  As I give talks on stress, health, and success, and go to networking meetings and conferences, I meet people who are starting new enterprises.

High hopes can turn to discouragement very easily when rejection is encountered.

It’s a great time to pause, breathe, and choose to use the rejection as a catalyst, rather than as a heavy anchor.

Handling the stress of rejection

Rejection can cause a particularly deep form of anger, because rejection seems to carry with it a heavy load: loss of self-esteem, and even of identity. Rejection can also result in depression.
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